Urbin Report

Thursday, March 24, 2005

A knowledge of History is not required for NY Times Reporters.

Larry Elder questions New York Times reporter Elisabeth Bumiller knowledge of history when she stated that Paul Wolfowitz was "a chief architect of one of the most unpopular wars in our history."

Mr. Elder checks the history books and finds out that, no surprise here, Ms. Burmiller had no grasp of the facts.
Here are just a few of the examples he gives:

Mexican-American War: Northern abolitionists and Whig members of Congress widely opposed this 1846 war. The opposition included then-Congressman Abraham Lincoln, and they called the war an "unnecessary and unconstitutional" war of "conquest." In fact, when the war ended, Congress censured President James Polk for starting the hostilities.

Spanish-American War: The press heatedly debated this 1898 war, and the war declaration approved by Congress passed with a margin of only seven votes in the Senate. Popular support for the relatively easy fight evaporated over the controversial annexing of Spain's colonies, such as the Philippines. In 1900, Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan made his opposition to the war the centerpiece of his campaign.

Korean War: U.S. military involvement began in the spring of 1950 with popular support. By January 1951, however, 49 percent of Americans believed that sending troops to Korea was a mistake, and 66 percent wanted us to pull out. The war's unpopularity played an important role in the election of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who pledged to end the war.


Mr. Elder then puts in the final nail in the coffin of Ms. Burmiller's credibility:
This brings us to the "unpopular" Iraqi War. Bush obtained a resolution from Congress (which passed the House 296 to 133, and the Senate 77 to 23) authorizing the use of force. At the time of America's entry into Iraq in 2003, a CBS/New York Times poll found that 76 percent of Americans approved of the U.S. military action against Iraq. Even now, the majority of Americans want us to stay the course.